Chef Esther Choi shares dumpling recipe

Restaurateur and chef Esther Choi drops by to make halmoni mandu, which is Korean for “grandma’s dumplings.”
6:21 | 11/24/22

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Transcript for Chef Esther Choi shares dumpling recipe
>>> WELCOME BACK. OUR NEXT GUEST COMBINES TRADITIONAL KOREAN DISHES WITH A MODERN FLARE, TAKING INSPIRATION FROM HER GRANDMOTHER'S COOKING. >> HER PASSION FOR FOOD STARTED WHEN SHE WAS WORKING IN RESTAURANTS AT JUST 14 YEARS OLD. THAT'S LED HER TO OWNING MULTIPLE AWARD-WINNING ESTABLISHMENTS. SHE'S HERE, RESTAURANTEUR AND CHEF OF MOCK BOY, ESTHER CHOI. >> THAT WAS A VERY SWEET PICTURE. WHY THIS RECIPE? WHY IS IT SO SPECIAL? >> THIS IS GRANDMA'S DUMPLING. THIS IS ACTUALLY THE MOST POPULAR ITEM ON OUR MENU. IT'S SO DELICIOUS. IT'S PARK, KIMCHI, TOFU, ZUCCHINI. WE MAKE EACH DUMPLING IN-HOUSE. >> ARE YOU GUYS READY? >> WE ARE READY. >> HAVE YOU MADE DUMPLINGS BEFORE? >> I HAVE NOT. I'VE ORDERED THEM, BUT I HAVE NOT MADE THEM. >> FAIR ENOUGH. FAIR ENOUGH. AS LONG AS YOU'RE EATING THEM, THEN I'M HAPPY. WE'LL START WITH GROUND PORK, YOU CAN SUBSTITUTE WITH GROUND BEEF, TURKEY OR OMIT THE MEAT COMPLETELY. IT'S TOTALLY OKAY TO BE VEGETARIAN. THERE'S TOFU. WE'LL DRAW OUT SOME OF THE MOISTURE FROM THE TOFU. WE DO THIS BECAUSE WE WANT THE FILLING TO BE SUPER DRY. YOU DON'T WANT IT TO BE WET, BECAUSE WHEN YOU'RE FORMING THEM, THEN THE WRAPPER GETS TOO WET. >> CHEESE CLOTH? >> CHEESE CLOTH, WATER. LOOK HOW MUCH WATER COMES OUT OF THE TOFU. I LOVE ADDING TOFU TO THE DUMPLINGS. IT MAKES THE DUMPLING FILLING SUPER SMOOTH. KIND OF EQUIVALENT TO ADDING BREAD CRUMBS TO A MEATBALL, BUT SEW TU IS A GREAT SUBSTITUTE FOR THAT. SO WE'RE GOING TO SQUEEZE OUT THE MOISTURE AND THEN WE ARE GOING TO DO THE SAME THING WITH THE ZUCCHINI. ZUCCHINI HAS A LOT OF MOISTURE IN IT. SO YOU WANT TO ADD A LITTLE BIT OF SALT, AND THAT HELPS DRAW OUT SOME OF THE MOISTURE. LOOK AT THAT. SO MUCH MOISTURE. WE WANT TO GET ALL OF THIS OUT, ALL THE WATER FROM THE ZUCCHINI OUT. THEN WE'LL ADD THAT. >> SUCH A GOOD TIP TO PUT THE SALT IN IT FIRST? >> YES. THE SALT HELPS DRAW OUT THE MOISTURE. THEN WE HAVE GARLIC CHIVES THAT ARE GOING TO GO IN, AND THEN KIMCHI. I FEEL LIKE THIS IS WHAT DIFFERENTIATES KOREAN DUMPLINGS FROM ANY OTHER DUMPLINGS. YOU KNOW HOW EVERY CULTURE HAS THEIR OWN TYPE OF DUMPLING? IT'S LIKE WHO DOESN'T LOVE A DUMPLING. WE ADD KIMCHI IN THERE TO MAKE IT KOREAN, AND THEN GARLIC AND ONION. DUMPLINGS I THINK IS ONE OF MY FAVORITE DISHES TO MAKE BECAUSE GROWING UP, MY GRANDMOTHER USED TO MAKE THIS IN HUGE BATCHES AND THEN THE ENTIRE FAMILY WOULD COME TOGETHER AND MAKE THE DUMPLINGS. >> DO YOU ADD SOY SAUCE, TOO? >> YES. THIS IS SOY SAUCE, A LITTLE FISH SAUCE, SESAME OIL AND CORNSTARCH. THAT WILL GIVE A NICE FLAVOR. SO WE'RE SEASONING THE FILLING WITH THE SOY SAUCE. >> WE ULTIMATELY GET HERE, RIGHT? >> YES. MIX IT ALL TOGETHER. >> THIS IS THE TRICK HERE. >> THIS IS WHERE WE GET OUR HANDS A LITTLE DIRTY. BUT THIS IS WHAT'S SO FUN ABOUT MAKING DUMPLINGS, IS THAT EVERYONE COMES TO THE TABLE TOGETHER. IT'S LIKE A WHOLE-DAY AFFAIR. WE WANT TO GRAB ONE OF THE SHELLS AND WE'LL GET SOME OF THE WATER OVER HERE AND JUST WET THE OUTER CORNERS. WE DO THIS BECAUSE WE WANT IT TO SEAL REALLY WELL. >> JUST THE OUTSIDE. >> JUST THE OUTSIDE. JUST LIKE SO. THEN WE'LL TAKE A TINY BIT OF THE DUMPLING FILLING, MAYBE A TEASPOON OR TWO. YOU DON'T WANT TO OVERFILL IT BECAUSE THEN IT WILL BURST. A LITTLE GOES A LONG WAY. THAT'S A LITTLE TOO MUCH. PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT. THEN WE'RE GOING TO SEAL IT -- WE'LL START WITH THE END, JUST PINCH ONE SIDE OF THE DUMPLING LIKE THAT. AND THEN WE'RE GOING TO FOLD, COMPLETE JUST ONE SIDE IF YOU CAN. >> I HAVE BLOWN THIS COMPLETELY. >> YOU KNOW WHAT? YOU CAN MAKE IT ANY WAY YOU WANT. >> OH, NOW YOU SAY THAT. >> MY FAMILY USED TO TELL ME GROWING UP, PRETTY DUMPLINGS MEANS YOU'RE GOING TO HAVE PRETTY BABIES. UGLY DUMPLINGS WILL MEAN UGLY BABIES. >> OH, NO. PRESSURE. >> GLAD I ALREADY HAD KIDS. >> THAT'S SO GOOD THOUGH. >> DID YOU MAKE DUMPLINGS BEFORE? >> THIS IS THE FIRST TIME, I SWEAR. >> SO YOU'RE GOOD WITH YOUR HANDS. >> ONCE YOU HAVE THEM FORMED, WHAT'S NEXT? >> ONCE YOU HAVE THEM FORMED LIKE SO, WE'LL COOK IT. OBVIOUSLY THERE'S SO MANY DIFFERENT WAYS I'M MAKING DUMPLINGS. DON'T WORRY ABOUT IT. PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT. WE'LL BRING IT OVER HERE AND NOW THERE'S SO MANY DIFFERENT WAYS TO COOK DUMPLINGS. PEOPLE LIKE STEAMING THEM, FRYING THEM. I LIKE DOING A COMBO OF BOTH. IT'S SEARED. IT'S CRISPY AND FRIED ON ONE SIDE AND THEN STEAMED ON THE OTHER. >> AMAZING. >> I LOVE DOING THIS METHOD BECAUSE I FEEL LIKE THEN YOU GET THE BEST OF BOTH WORLD. SOMETIMES YOU WANT STEAMED DUMPLINGS. SOMETIMES YOU WANT FRIED, RIGHT? WE'LL ADD THE DUMPLINGS TO A NON-STICK SKILLET WITH A LITTLE OIL. >> HOW LONG DO YOU KEEP THEM ON THERE? >> WE'LL GET IT SLIGHTLY CRISPY, MAYBE A MINUTE OR TWO. GO AHEAD AND TASTE THE DUMPLINGS. >> OKAY. CHEF, REALLY, THANK YOU FOR BEING HERE, TEACHING US HOW TO MAKE DUMPLINGS. >> GRANDMA'S DUMPLINGS. >> HOW DO YOU SAY

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